Watertravel & Waterside Destinations
Churches in the commune of Dieppe as seen from the castle museum.
Google Translate
(requires Flash)







Search Hotels
in France

Churches in Dieppe —
Fine Examples of Classic Architecture

Among the many sights that will greet you as you wander through Dieppe are these interesting old churches.

Above: L’église Saint Jacques, so named because Dieppe is on one of the pilgrimage routes to Santiago de Compostela, Spain, where the faithful go to pay homage at the grave of St. James the Apostle. Below: La Chapelle de Notre-Dame de Bonsecours stands prominently perched atop the cliff to the northeast of downtown Dieppe.

L’église Saint Rémy and L’église Saint Jacques are still the tallest buildings in the old town and dominate the skyline as seen from the castle. The name, L’église Saint Jacques, derives from the fact that Dieppe is on one of the pilgrimage routes to Santiago de Compostela, Spain, where the faithful pay homage at the grave of St. James the Apostle. L’église Saint Rémy dates back a thousand years, although the current structure was constructed in 1522.

As with most buildings of great age, especially those in cities such as Dieppe which have seen many wars and some hard-driven inclement weather, there have been damages and subsequent reconstructions over the centuries. Both of these ancient churches are easily visited in a stroll around the old section of town.

La Chapelle de Notre-Dame de Bonsecours is perched prominently atop a cliff to the northeast of downtown Dieppe, across the river and just above the ferry terminal. It’s more of a hike than a leisurely walk from the center of the old town and the beach. We went by car.

A cat sits beside open door at L'Église St. Jaques, Dieppe, Normandy Coast, France.

Normandy Coast

Calais & Dunkirk

Dieppe

 Harbor and Quay

 Castle Museum

 Churches

 Beach

Le Tréport

Ètretat

Sword Beach
Luc-sur-Mer

Juno Beach
Courseulles-sur-Mer

Gold Beach
Arromanches-les-Bains

Mont Saint-Michel

Central France

Home

Copyright © Don Douglas